Tuesday, March 31, 2009

Humbled by the blues

Friends, I just want to let you all know that I am humbled by the blues. I love this music so much, and when I started this blog I thought I had a good understanding of it all. I thought that because I was raised in the blues, listen to the blues, read about the blues, played the blues and had lived the blues that I really understood it.

But there is just so much to know, so many great songs, so many great musicians. So much culture that is related to the blues. So much history, and it never stops it just keeps on going. This music is high art, and don't let anyone tell you anything different.

You could spend your whole life studying just guitar players, you could spend your whole life just studying guitar players from the state of Mississippi. You could spend your whole life just studying slide guitar players from the state of Mississippi. Not to mention, singers, harmonica players, drummers, piano players and many other kinds of musicians in all different kinds of combinations from just the state of Mississippi. And then you could do it all over again for the states of Texas, Louisiana, New York, California, South Carolina, Illinois, just put your favorite state, city or even country where Mississippi is above.

I'm humbled and still I wonder "how blue can you get baby."

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Monday, March 30, 2009

Lyrics To Fatting Frogs For Snakes by Sonny Boy Williams II

Fattening Frogs for Snakes, Sonny Boy Williamson & Animals


It took me a long time, to find out my mistakes
Took me a long time, to find out my mistakes
(it sho' did man)
But I bet you my bottom dollar, I'm not fattenin' no more frogs for snakes

I found out my downfall, back in nineteen and thirty
(I started checkin')
I found out my downfall, from nineteen and thirty
I'm tellin' all of my friends, I'm not fattenin' no more frogs for snakes

All right now... (solo)

Yeh it is nineteen and fifty-seven, I've got to correct all of my mistakes
Whoa man, nineteen and fifty-seven, I've got to correct all of my mistakes
I'm tellin' my friends includin' my wife and everybody else,
not fattenin' no more frogs for snakes


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Sunday, March 29, 2009

I Feel Like Going To Church - Eric Bibb - Don't Let Nobody Drag Your Spirit Down

Big Moma told me, boy don't you let nobody drag your spirit down, going to be some people trying to turn you around...






Don't Ever Let Nobody Drag Your Spirit Down

by Eric Bibb From the Album Painting Signs

Eric Bibb @Amazon.com

Eric Bibb @SqueezeMyLemon

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I Feel Like Going To Church: Needed Time



Note From YouTubeTexas blues giant "Lightning Hopkins" recorded this song in 1952. Organised religion wasn't an important element in Lightning's life, and "Needed Time" seems to have been the only religious song in his recorded repertoire.

This song was also used in a great movie called "Sounder", directed by Martin Ritt in 1972. It tells the story of a sharecropper's family trying to survive the depression.

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Saturday, March 28, 2009

The Sledge Grits Band

I would not normally refer to a band that plays blues music as cute. But if you watch the videos below, I am sure you will agree that "The Sledge Grits Band" are some of the cutest little musicians around.

They were featured on CBS' "The Early Show" Singing Family Face Off. These sisters from Salinas, Calif. performed Aretha Franklin's classic Reach Out And Touch Somebody's Hand.

I think it will be worth keeping a close eye on these young ladies.

Sledge Grits Singing Family


The Sledge Grits Band on The Early Show


The Sledge Grits Band @LiveBluesWorld

The Sledge Grits Band @MySpace

GritsWorld.com

Oh, and I think this proves that the blues is alive and kicking.

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Friday, March 27, 2009

Friday Blues Funny - Guitar Face - Michael Burks

Michael Burks


photo by Suzanne Foschino Photography

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Blues Word of the Day - Back door man / friend

back door man/friend

1 - the lover of a married woman who sneaks out the back door before the man of the house gets home

This phrase can be found in:
Blind Boy Fuller, I Crave My Pigmeat, Howlin' Wolf, Back Door Man
Lightnin' Hopkins, Back Door Friend


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Wednesday, March 25, 2009

It's the Birthday of Bo Carter

Complete Recorded Works In Chronological Order,
Vol. 5, 1938-1940
Complete Recorded Works In Chronological Order, Vol. 5, 1938-1940 by Bo Carter


Armenter "Bo Carter" Chatmon was actually born on March 21, 1893 (the same day of the year as Son House) and he died on September 21 back in 1964. He was a popular early blues musician. According to wikipedia;
He was a member of the Mississippi Sheiks in concerts, and on a few of their recordings. Carter also managed that group, which included his brother, Lonnie Chatmon, on fiddle and occasionally Sam Chatmon on bass, along with a non-relative, Walter Vincson, on guitar and lead vocal.

Bo Carter Special Tribute Video


Bo Carter @Amazon.com

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Tuesday, March 24, 2009

Robert Johnson-Traveling Riverside Blues

You know what I'm talking about...

Robert Johnson-Traveling Riverside Blues


Copyright Wikipedia

"Travelling Riverside Blues" is a blues song written and recorded in Dallas, Texas by legendary bluesman Robert Johnson. Johnson's June 20, 1937 recording has a typical 12 bar blues structure, played on a single guitar tuned to open G, with a slide. It was first released on the 1961 compilation LP King of the Delta Blues Singers. The song has proved popular with more recent blues musicians.

Versions:

A verse was incorporated into Cream's "Crossroads", their 1968 version of Johnson's "Cross Road Blues".

English rock band Led Zeppelin's version of this song was recorded at the BBC studios on June 24, 1969, upon which Jimmy Page later dubbed extra guitar tracks. It was was broadcast four days later on John Peel's Top Gear show under the title "Travelling Riverside Blues '69". It is quite different from the original, and it is more a tribute to Robert Johnson than a straight cover. The song showcases a riff by Page (also in open G tuning), and in the lyrics Robert Plant quotes many Robert Johnson songs, such as "She studies evil all the time", from "Kind Hearted Woman Blues", and "Why don't you come on in my kitchen", from "Come on in My Kitchen" (which is heard during the song's solo). Conversely, parts of Johnson's "Travelling Riverside Blues" are used as lyrics in Led Zeppelin's "The Lemon Song", namely the "squeeze my lemon" sequence. It is likely that Johnson borrowed this himself, from a song recorded in the same year (1937) called "She Squeezed My Lemon".The line "she got a mortgage on my body and a lien on my soul" and reference to front teeth lined with gold at the end of the song are also from Johnson's original song.

The May 2008 issue of Uncut Magazine focused upon Zeppelin's 2008 reunion. A promotional CD attached to the magazine was titled "When the Levee Breaks: 15 classic tracks that inspired Led Zeppelin." The CD included the original "Travelling Riverside Blues" by Robert Johnson. Inside the magazine, the track commentary elaborated upon Zeppelin's version:

"Plant's infamous 'squeeze my lemon till the juice runs down my leg' line on Led Zep II's "The Lemon Song" was lifted from this '36 cut by the king of the Delta blues singers--although Page partly borrows the track's memorable riff from Howlin' Wolf's 'Killing Floor.'"

"Travelling Riverside Blues" can be found on the Led Zeppelin BBC Sessions album, on disc 1 of the Led Zeppelin Box Set, and on the expanded Coda album from The Complete Studio Recordings box set. It was interest from US radio interviewers and fans during Page's Outrider tour that originally led him to negotiate with BBC Enterprises for the song's release.A promotional video clip was also released in 1990, with outtake footage from the band's 1976 concert film, The Song Remains the Same. The song reached number seven on the Billboard Top Rock Tracks Top 50 chart in November 1990, culled from national album rock radio airplay reports.

Eric Clapton covered this song, along with several other Robert Johnson classics, on his 2004 album, Me and Mr. Johnson.

Myles Kennedy has sung and played the song with his band Alter Bridge at live shows in 2007.

Dion covered this song on his 2006 Grammy-nominated album "Bronx in Blue".

Lyrics:

If your man get personal, want you to have your fun
If your man get personal, want you to have your fun
Just come on back to Friars Point, mama, and barrelhouse all night long
I got womens in Vicksburg, clean on into Tennessee
I got womens in Vicksburg, clean on into Tennessee
But my Friars Point rider, now, hops all over me
I ain't gon' to state no color, but her front teeth crowned with gold
I ain't gon' to state no color, but her front teeth is crowned with gold
She got a mortgage on my body, now, and a lien on my soul
Lord, I'm goin' to Rosedale, gon' take my rider by my side
Lord, I'm goin' to Rosedale, gon' take my rider by my side
We can still barrelhouse baby, on the riverside
Now you can squeeze my lemon 'til the juice run down my...
(spoken) 'til the juice rune down my leg, baby, you know what I'm talkin' about
You can squeeze my lemon 'til the juice run down my leg
(spoken) That's what I'm talkin' 'bout, now
But I'm goin' back to Friars Point, if I be rockin'to my head

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Monday, March 23, 2009

It's the Birthday of Son House

Well actually a couple of days ago was, but because he is one of my favorite blues men of all time I did not want to let his day go by without a nod and a tip of the hat.

There are some bluesmen, who are a major part of blues music, and Son House definitely was one of those guy, but I would go so far as to say that Son House is a musician, who is a major part of music as a whole. If we consider those he influenced, like Muddy Waters, Robert Johnson, The Rolling Stones, Eric Clapton, Led Zeppelin, Aerosmith, Stevie Ray Vaughnand and those he played with, like Charley Patton and Willie Brown, then I'm willing to say that Elvis, the Beatles and any other musicians you can think of are probably influnced by him in some small way also.

"He was born Eddie James House, Jr., on March 21, 1902, in Riverton, MS. By the age of 15, he was preaching the gospel in various Baptist churches as the family seemingly wandered from one plantation to the next. He didn't even bother picking up a guitar until he turned 25; to quote House, "I didn't like no guitar when I first heard it; oh gee, I couldn't stand a guy playin' a guitar. I didn't like none of it." But if his ambivalence to the instrument was obvious, even more obvious was the simple fact that Son hated plantation labor even more and had developed a taste for corn whiskey. After drunkenly launching into a blues at a house frolic in Lyon, MS, one night and picking up some coin for doing it, the die seemed to be cast; Son House may have been a preacher, but he was part of the blues world now." ~ Cub Koda, All Music Guide


Son House - Death Letter Blues


The Complete Library of Congress Sessions, 1941-1942
The Complete Library of Congress Sessions, 1941-1942 by Son House

This album, is a classic re-release of an item deleted in 1997 features 19 blues recordings from Mississippi Delta bluesman Son House recorded in 1941-42. He's on guitar & vocals, joined by Willie Brown, Fiddlin' Joe Martin & Leory Williams. A portion of this was recorded at Klack's Store, Lake Cormorant, Mississippi. You'll hear occasional railway noises in the background, as the store, which had the electricity necessary for the recording, was close to a branch-line between the lake & Robinsonville, which is where the remaining titles were recorded.

Track Listing;

1. Levee Camp Blues
2. Government Fleet Blues
3. Walking Blues
4. Shetland Pony Blues
5. Fo' Clock Blues
6. Camp Hollers
7. Delta Blues
8. Special Rider Blues
9. Special Rider Blues
10. Low Down Dirty Dog Blues
11. Depot Blues
12. Key of Minor
13. American Defense
14. Am I Right or Wrong
15. Walking Blues
16. Country Farm Blues
17. Pony Blues
18. Jinx Blues, Pt. 1
19. Jinx Blues, Pt. 2

Son House @SqueezeMyLemon

Son House @Amazon.com

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Sunday, March 22, 2009

I Feel Like Going To Church: Fisk Jubilee Singers

Here we see that the circle is complete, or at least we take another turn. An African American Gospel choir, goes back to Africa. And performs a traditional song. Who knows, some young African kid may be inspired to make some great music.

Fisk Jubilee Singers: Sacred Journey - "Mister Banjo"


Recorded live from Elmina Castle in Ghana, West Africa, the Fisk Jubilee Singers perform "Mister Banjo" featured on their new album "Sacred Journey."

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Saturday, March 21, 2009

NPR Post on Sister Rosetta Tharpe

As I type this I'm listening to an NPR report on Sister Rosetta Tharpe. A marker was recently placed on her grave.

Today would have marked the 94th birthday of pioneering singer and guitarist Sister Rosetta Tharpe. She was a major influence on two generations of rock and soul musicians, but Tharpe is practically unknown today — so unknown that she didn't have a proper headstone until recently.

Sister Rosetta Tharpe's Grave Stone photo by Joel Rose


"She would sing until you cried and then she would sing until you danced for joy. She helped to keep the church alive, and the saints rejoicing."


Sister Rosetta Tharpe @SqueezeMyLemon

Sister Rosetta Tharpe @Amazon.com

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Friday, March 20, 2009

Friday Blues Funny - Guitar Face - Ana Popovic 2

Ana Popovic


ANA POPOVIC @ The Rams Head Annapolis

photo by Glenn's photography

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Thursday, March 19, 2009

The Best Blues Guitarist Alive???

Sometimes I answer questions over at Yahoo Answers. A lot of the questions are asked by kids and other people who do not really understand blues music very well. I like to share my knowledge and set people on the path of understanding the blues.

This question, which I think is kind of silly, because some people think that music is like a sport. They think that in the same way that you might pick the best wide receiver in the NFL you can pick the best guitarist in blues music. I personally don't think it can be done, because blues music is an art. And art is subjective!

Who's the best Blues Guitarist ALIVE right now?

Now, I'm not talking about one of the old feelas who's still doing gigs aged 70, but a modern young version of Hendrix, say.

Someone who still plays the blues from the heart and understands the idea of playing as if your heart is being ripped out of you because you'er suffering is so immense. Someone who REALLY understands the blues.

So, who is Numero Uno?
OK, this question makes me really tired. There is no number one. There are too many styles, too many great players to reduce all the hard work the these musicians do to just say that there is a number one. And even for those who can come up with a number one, they don't agree on who that is. LOL.

In my opinion, there are a lot of great blues guitarist, and there always have been. As you can see from all the answers that you have received that opinions fall all over the place.

But I think that right now is really a good time for blues guitarist.

Here are just a few of the people playing blues today that are young and up and coming that I like. In no certain order.

Sonny Landreth - @YouTube - @Amazon.com

Kenny Wayne Sheppard - @YouTube - @Amazon.com

Dereck Trucks - @YouTube - @Amazon.com

Rory Block - @YouTube - @Amazon.com

Guy Davis - @YouTube - @Amazon.com

Albert Cummings - @YouTube - @Amazon.com

I could probably name about ten more, but I just wanted to give you a few to take a look at.

Now if all goes well for these musicians 30 years or so from now, people may be arguing if they were some of the best of all times. What ever that means.

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Wednesday, March 18, 2009

New Release - Eric Lindell – 'Gulf Coast Highway'

Gulf Coast Highway
Gulf Coast Highway by Eric Lindell


Track Listings

1. If Love Can't Find A Way
2. Willin' and Able
3. Love and Compassion
4. This Love Is Gonna Last
5. Turnin' It Out
6. It's A Drag
7. Lullaby for Mercy Ann
8. The Look
9. I Can Get Off On You
10. Country Livin'
11. Dirty Bird
12. I'll Be Around
13. Here Comes The Blues Again
14. Crying Time
15. Raw Doggin'



Eric Lindell @SqueezeMyLemon

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Tuesday, March 17, 2009

The Men Behind The Bluesmen: Sam Phillips

Sun King:
The Life and Times
of Sam Phillips,
the Man Behind Sun Records
Sun King: The Life and Times of Sam Phillips, the Man Behind Sun Records by Kevin Crouch and Tanja Crouch


"Imperfectly Perfect !!"---- Sam Phillips and Sun Records


Sam Phillips was born on January 5, 1923 and he passed away on July 30, 2003. He was a record producer who played an important role in the emergence of blues music and rock and roll as the major form of popular music in the 1950s. He is best known for having discovered Elvis Presley, and is associated with several other noteworthy rhythm and blues and rock and roll stars during that time.

According to Wikipedia;
On January 3, 1950, Phillips opened the "Memphis Recording Service" at 706 Union Avenue in Memphis, Tennessee, which also served as the studios for Phillips' own label, Sun Records, through the 1950s. In addition to musical performances, he recorded events such as weddings and funerals, selling the recordings.

Phillips recorded what some—notably music historian Peter Guralnick—consider the first rock and roll record: "Rocket 88" by Jackie Brenston and his Delta Cats, a band led by 19-year-old Ike Turner, who also wrote the song. The recording was released on the Chess/Checker record label in Chicago, in 1951. From 1950 to 1954 Phillips recorded the music of black rhythm and blues artists such as James Cotton, Rufus Thomas, Rosco Gordon, Little Milton, Bobby Blue Bland, and others. Blues legends such as B.B. King and Howlin' Wolf made their first recordings at his studio. In fact, Phillips deemed Howlin' Wolf his greatest discovery and he deemed Elvis Presley his second greatest discovery.

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Monday, March 16, 2009

Happy Birthday To Lightnin' Hopkins

Sam "Lightnin’" Hopkins was born on March 15 in 1912 and yesterday was his birthdate, he passed away on January 30 in 1982.

A good friend said, have you ever heard of Lightnin' Hopkins? I said no, he pulled a cassette tape out of his top shirt pocket and tossed it to me, "Give this a listen, your going to like it."

That has turned out to be one of the biggest understatements in this love affair that I have with the blues.

As I have mentioned in other post here at SML, I love Lightnin' Hopkins. My favorite album of his is Complete Aladdin Recordings*Complete Aladdin Recordings*

The Blues Accordin' to Lightnin' Hopkins (1967)


Lightnin Hopkins' Last Gig


Complete Aladdin Recordings
*Complete Aladdin Recordings*
Complete Aladdin Recordings*Complete Aladdin Recordings* by Lightnin' Hopkins
click image for mp3 samples


Lightnin' Hopkins @SqueezeMyLemon

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Sunday, March 15, 2009

I Feel Like Going to Church - Trouble of the World - Mahalia Jackson

Trouble of the World - Mahalia Jackson


The above clip is from the 1959 version of the award winning movie "Imitation of Life" it is one of those movies that is such a big part of the black culture of my youth. If you want to see some people living the blues, watch that movie.

Again I think that this song captures the mood of gospel blues so well. And while it has a sad theme it soars in such a way that is joyous. And that to me is what the blues is all about. That journey from sadness to joy.

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Saturday, March 14, 2009

Old Man Blues Video

Old man blues -


Notes From YouTube; Based on the old woman blues by Champion Jack Dupree. The longer stop time verses are Geoff C's.

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Friday, March 13, 2009

Friday Blues Funny - Guitar Face - Ana Popovic



ANA POPOVIC @ The Rams Head Annapolis

photo by Glenn's photography

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Thursday, March 12, 2009

Gary Moore - Still Got the Blues

Gary Moore - Still Got the Blues


According to Wikipedia;
Gary Moore (born Robert William Gary Moore, 4 April 1952, Belfast, Northern Ireland) is a Northern Irish guitarist. In a career dating back to the 1960s, he has played with artists including Thin Lizzy, Colosseum II, Greg Lake and the Blues-rock band Skid Row, as well as having a successful solo career. Among many cameo appearances over the years, he performed the lead guitar solo on "She's My Baby" from Traveling Wilburys Vol. 3.


Still Got The Blues
Still Got The Blues by Gary Moore
click image for mp3 samples

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Wednesday, March 11, 2009

Blues songs about War Question

Someone asked the question over at Yahoo Answers; Do you know of any blues songs about war?

My Answer

Yes, during Vietnam many blues musicians sang songs that mention that war.

"Vietnam Blues" by JB Lenoir


B.B. King has a couple of songs where he mentions returning from Vietnam.

Sonny Boy Williamson I also sang songs about WWII, as probably other musicians too. See his Decoration Day Blues No. 2 his album Essential Sonny Boy Williamson.

Sonny Boy Williamson
Complete Recorded Works, Vol. 5 (1945-1947) by Sonny Boy Williamson (John Lee Williamson)


Sonny Boy Williamson (John Lee Williamson)@SqueezeMyLemon

J.B. Lenoir @SqueezeMyLemon

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Tuesday, March 10, 2009

Smoking Hot Nina Simone

Some problems are nice to have, consider this clip of Nina Simone singing the blues. Though she is not what you would call a traditional blues musician, she performed all types of music. So if you have a blues blog, and you find a smoking hot clip like this, "Then What Are You Gonna to Do."

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Monday, March 09, 2009

Double Trouble by Otis Rush

I Can't Quit You Baby:
The Complete Cobra Sessions
I Can't Quit You Baby: The Complete Cobra Sessions


People, watching the news on TV has given me the blues. It's that bad luck and trouble. They say you can make it if you try. Double Trouble, this is how I feel right now, and I'm sure there are a whole lot of you who feel the same way.
"I lay awake at night with thoughts of love, just so troubled
It is hard to keep a job, laid off, having double trouble

But hey hey yeah,
they say you can make it if you try,

Yes, some of this generation is millionares,
it's hard for me to keep decent clothes to wear

Your love has got me walking baby
and I have no place to go

Bad luck and trouble taken me
I have no money to show

But, hey hey to make it you've got to try
Baby that's no lie

Yes, some of this generation is millionares,
it is hard for me to keep decent clothes to wear"
From Otis Rush - I Can't Quit You Baby (The Blues Collection Vol.19) - 05 - Double Trouble

Double Trouble


Otis Rush and Eric Clatpon "Double Trouble"



Otis Rush - Live at Montreux 1986
Otis Rush - Live at Montreux 1986 (2006) DVD
Please click images


Otis Rush @Amazon.com

Otis Rush @SqueezeMyLemon

Eric Clapton @SqueezeMyLemon

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Sunday, March 08, 2009

I Feel Like Going To Church - Eric Clapton, Steve Winwood - Presence of the Lord

While not really a gospel song, this performance of "Presence of the Lord" is definitely informed by gospel blues. And again it is an example of how gospel music serves as a base for a lot of blues, and rock music also.

Eric Clapton, Steve Winwood - Presence of the Lord


Notes from YouTube; Eric Clapton and Steve Winwood at the Crossroads Guitar Festival 2007, with Derek Trucks and Doyle Bramhill

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Saturday, March 07, 2009

Little Walter: His Best The Chess 50th Anniversary Collection

His Best:Little Walter
His Best :(Little Walter)The Chess 50th Anniversary Collection
If you read SML often you probably know that I love harmonica players. And the harmonica player that I love listening to the most is Little Walter. And the Little Walter album that I like listening to the most, is His Best :(Little Walter)The Chess 50th Anniversary Collection.

I am serious when I tell you that if I was placed on a desert island, and could only have one album, this might be the album. And I bet someone is wondering how could I pick a Little Walter album over say a Muddy Waters album, or maybe a Howlin' Wolf album. Well part of it may be my mood right now, if I pose this question on another day, I might come up with a different album, but right now this is how I feel.

I agree with Robert Gordon's assessment of Little Walter when he said;

Marion "Little Walter" Jacobs is perhaps the most influential harmonica player on contemporary blues, and his collection is a great place to start. He was trained by Muddy Waters, but brought a more swinging feel to blues. Muddy and his band accompany Little Walter on many hits, as do Robert "Jr." Lockwood, the Aces, and other Chicago greats. In the 1950s, Little Walter's popularity eclipsed even Waters', his style a little more relaxed and pop-oriented. Walter's versions of many songs are the standards: "Blues with a Feeling," "You're So Fine," "Juke." Great stuff.

Track Listing
1. Juke 2:47
2. Can't Hold Out Much Longer 3:03
3. Mean Old World 2:57
4. Sad Hours 3:15
5. Tell Me Mama 2:47
6. Off The Wall 2:52
7. Blues With A Feeling 3:10
8. You're So Fine 3:07
9. Too Late 2:44
10. Last Night 2:46
11. Mellow Down Easy 2:45
12. My Babe 2:44
13. Roller Coaster 2:56
14. Hate To See You Go 2:20
15. It Ain't Right 2:57
16. Boom, Boom Out Goes The Light 2:53
17. Confessin' The Blues 3:06
18. Key To The Highway 2:48
19. Everything's Gonna Be Alright 2:52
20. Just Your Fool 2:23

Little Walter mp3s @Amazon

Little Walter @SqueezeMyLemon

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Friday, March 06, 2009

Friday Blues Funny - Guitar Face - The Holmes Brothers



The Holmes Brothers @ The Blue Bird Blues Festival

photo by Glenn's photography

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Thursday, March 05, 2009

Blues Blogs In The Spotlight: A Copywriter's Blues

Another blues blog that I often read is A Copywiter's Blues. This blog is notable because it post some of the most comprehensive posting on blues greats to be found on the web. A typical post includes several video clips and other links to support and act as a resource for background information.

You can tell that the author Alex Badalic is a blues music lover by the way he writes about it. He also relates his experience with the musicians over the years as he relates various shows and other important milestones.

One reason that I like this blog so much is how it often surprised me with his selection of musicians and his presentation.

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Wednesday, March 04, 2009

Big Joe Williams in His Own Words


I love it when the bluesmen speak for themselves. There are a lot of people like me who write about what they said and did, but it is best to hear them say it in their own words.

Here we have Big Joe Williams talking about his music, and how he has written songs for women that he has known over the years. It is very delightful to here him talk about some of these mean old blues in such a light hearted way, with panache and a bit of comedy.

Big Joe Williams - Arkansas Woman (1966)


Shake Your Boogie
Shake Your Boogie by Big Joe Williams
please click image

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Monday, March 02, 2009

It's the Birthday of Rory Gallagher

Irish Tour
Irish Tour by Rory Gallagher
Rory Gallagher was born on 2 March 1948, and he passed away on 14 June 1995. He was an Irish blues/rock guitarist, born in Ballyshannon, County Donegal, part of the Province of Ulster.

And even though he had a shot life, and he suffered from illness, the guitarist, singer, and songwriter got a lot done in the world of blues music. His death was due to complications from a liver transplant surgery on June 14, 1995, at age 47.

If you are not familiar with his music click on the images in this post to listen to sample mp3s. Critics agree that Irish Tour 1974, Calling Card, or Fresh Evidence, show case his abilities as a guitarist, singer and songwriter.

Calling CardCalling Card by Rory Gallagher













Fresh Evidence
Fresh Evidence by Rory Gallagher

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